Jump to content

Change
Photo

Brik/Bourek/Borek/Braewats

- - - - -

  • Please log in to reply
32 replies to this topic

#21
♥JaNNaH♥

♥JaNNaH♥

    Honorary Algerian

  • Moderators
  • 5,092 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:London

Current mood:
Briouates with eggs and capers

If you are quick fingered and lucky, you may manage to cook these treats until the outside is crisp, the inside runny and yellow: it takes a little skill. (Cowards may soft boil the quails’ eggs then shell them and use them in the filling.) Briouates delight in their many forms; they can be tiny or large; rectangular or triangular; savoury or sweet: or even honey dipped. Small pies like these are called briks in Tunisia and Algeria and in Morocco’s Rif Mountains. Since ouarka is round, half-circular pieces create triangle shapes best; filo rectangles create squares easily, but please yourself.

Serves 4-5 (Makes 18)

75g (3oz) preserved lemons
50g (1 cup) coarsely chopped fresh parsley, coriander (cilantro) or celery leaves
50g (1/3 cup) salted capers
¼ teaspoon cumin-seasoned salt
9 ouarka sheets (feuilles de brick) or 275g (10oz) filo pastry (18sheets)
75-100g (1/3-1/2 cup) ghee or clarified butter, melted, lukewarm, for brushing
18 quails’ eggs
1 egg white, beaten with a fork
Virgin olive oil, for deep frying

1 First make the filling. Discard the central flesh of the preserved lemons; slice their skins. Mix the lemon skins, herbs, capers and Cumin-seasoned salt together. If using filo pastry, preheat the oven to 180°C (350°F).

2 Put one pastry sheet in front of you, keeping the remainder covered by a cloth or sheet of heavy plastic while you work.

3 If using ouarka sheets, slice a round sheet into half to give 2 semi-circles. Brush one side generously with ghee. Set half a tablespoon of filling onto the corner of one semicircle on the unbuttered side. Fold over the point to enclose it. Fold again, then break one quail’s egg in and continue to roll and fold, working quickly, until the pastry is used up and the egg is neatly trapped inside, brushing the final joins with egg white. Continue the process until 9 are made.

4 If using ouarka sheets, deep-fry in batches of 2 in 10cm (4 in) of virgin olive oil heated to 180°C (350°F). Cook until crisp, about 3-4 minutes, turning halfway through. Continue with the remaining pastries until the first batch is cooked and ready. Repeat to make the next 9 briouates

5 If using filo pastry rectangles, brush one side with ghee. Set a share of filling on the unbrushed side, at its centre-base. Fold up the base flap then side flaps over it to cover it. Add the quail eggs. Continue to fold up and over to form a neat square, using egg white to seal the final flaps Brush finished briouates all over again with more ghee. Set them on an oven tray. Bake the briouates for 20-25 minutes, turning them over half way through Cook until golden and crispy.
Eat while hot using your fingers.

Cumin- seasoned salt

In a mortar, grind equal quantities of cumin seeds and seasalt crystals.

From A Taste of Morocco by Clare Ferguson

Please note, filo pastry comes in many shapes, so you can make triangles and other shapes quite easily despite what is said in the recipe. Preserved lemons are shown on another thread here, or they are available at some supermarkets
Truly, to Allaah we belong and truly, to Him we shall return

Posted Image


#22
♥JaNNaH♥

♥JaNNaH♥

    Honorary Algerian

  • Moderators
  • 5,092 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:London

Current mood:
Jban Briouates with Cilantro

Preparation time: 30 minutes

Cooking time: 3-4 minutes

Serves 4

31/2 oz/100g black pitted olives
½ bunch cilantro (coriander)
2 pieces jban (fresh goat’s cheese)
White pepper
2 eggs
1 1/4lbs/500g yufka pastry dough sheets (you can substitute with filo pastry)
Oil for frying
For the garnish:
1 tomato
Leaves of mint

If you travel to the Fez region, you will certainly have the opportunity of tasting the famous briouates. In a menu of several courses, these dainty little bites are served as an appetizer or a dessert. Their fillings vary according to what the chef puts in them or what is available on the market. Some prepare them with chicken, pigeon, spinach, or shrimp. Others prefer almond paste or honey.
You can let your imagination run free when preparing the fillings. The chef for this dish has decided on jban, the typical Moroccan soft goat’s cheese. This cheese is generally used in sweet cookies and cakes, and is made only from goat’s milk. It contains les than 45% fat and has a sweetish, sometimes slightly sour aroma. If you cannot get hold of it, ricotta is also suitable, but it has a much more neutral taste.
In this recipe the cilantro gives the goat’s cheese its special aroma. Cilantro---coriander leaf---is an important ingredient in many Arab dishes, from salads, soups and ragouts to fish. Black olives are particularly favoured in the Mediterranean, and are pickled in brine. Even if they are rinsed, they don’t lose their salty taste. Remember this when seasoning!
In Morocco, cooking is unthinkable without sheets of yufka pastry. These are made from flour, salt, and water only, and in earlier years families made them themselves. Experience is necessary in their preparation. Wherever yufka pastry sheets are still made by hand, this is done by very experienced women who still use the tabsil dial ouarqua, a copper tray with a tin-plated surface on which the pastry sheets can be heated.

Dice the black olives into small pieces on the work surface.

Wash the cilantro (coriander) and chop finely with a large knife.

In a bowl, mix the goat’s cheese, diced olives, and chopped cilantro.

Season with pepper. Break 1 egg into a small bowl, beat and add to the salad bowl. Mix using a wooden spoon.

Using a long knife cut the yufka pastry lengthways into strips. Break the second egg into a small bowl, beat and put aside.

Place a little filling onto each strip. Then fold from left to right to make a closed triangle. Stick down the end with beaten egg. Deep-fry for 3-4 minutes. Drain. Arrange on serving platters and garnish with a piece of tomato and fresh mint.

Taken from Morocco Mediterranean Cuisine, recipes supplied by various Moroccan chefs

#23
♥JaNNaH♥

♥JaNNaH♥

    Honorary Algerian

  • Moderators
  • 5,092 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:London

Current mood:
Brik
By Sue Nelson

One of my favorite snacks in Tunisia is a brik (pronounced breek); it is somewhat like a turnover, but different. Like a soufflé, it must be served immediately. A Tunisian brik always has an egg in it, but it can have other goodies such as tuna, potatoes, capers and parsley. The casing (malsouka, which is not available in the States) is a cross between phyllo dough and a spring roll sheet (for making eggrolls.)


A brik is deep fried, olive oil is best, then drained on a paper towel. Here is a tasty version which takes only 15 minutes to make.

1 small onion (optional)
1 six-ounce can of tuna
2 tablespoons of chopped parsley
2 tablespoons of grated Parmesan
4 eggroll or spring roll wrappers
4 small eggs
Olive oil for frying
Lemon wedges

Mix together tuna, parsley, Parmesan cheese, salt and pepper. Spoon about one fourth of the filling onto one half of each wrapper, making a well to hold most of the egg. Break an egg into each well and fold wrapping into triangle shape to cover the mixture and the egg. Seal both sides of the wrapping together. Fry in one half inch of hot olive oil (vegetable oil can be used, but olive oil works best). When brown on one side, flip over to continue frying. A couple minutes on each side is enough if the oil is hot enough. Serve sprinkled with lemon juice.

The trick is to hold the triangular brik with the point up while biting into it and not let the egg run down your chin. Good luck!

#24
♥JaNNaH♥

♥JaNNaH♥

    Honorary Algerian

  • Moderators
  • 5,092 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:London

Current mood:
Turkish Bourek

Filo Cigars Filled with Feta, Parsley, Mint and Dill


These classic cigar-shaped Pastries, Sigara Boreği (borak), are a popular snack and meze food, and they are also good as nibbles with drinks. Here they are filled with a mixture of cheese and herbs, but other popular fillings include aromatic minced meat, baked aubergine and cheese, or mashed pumpkin, cheese and dill. The filo pastry can be folded into triangles, but cigars are the most traditional shape. They can be prepared in advance and kept under a damp dish towel in the refrigerator until you are ready to fry them.

Serves three to four

Ingredients

225g/8oz feta cheese
1 large (US extra large) egg, lightly beaten
1 small bunch each of fresh flat leaf parsley, mint and dill, finely chopped
4-5 sheets of filo pastry
Sunflower oil, for deep frying
Dill fronds, to garnish (optional)

1 In a bowl, mash the feta with a fork. Beat in the egg and fold in the herbs.
2 Place the sheets of filo on a flat surface and cover with a damp dish towel to keep them moist. Working with one sheet at a time, cut the filo into strips about 10-13cm/4-5in wide, and pile them on top of each other. Keep the strips covered with another damp dish towel.
3 Lay one filo strip on the surface in front of you, making sure you recover the other strips with the dish towel. Place a heaped teaspoon of the cheese filling along one of the short ends.
4 Roll the end of the pastry over the filling, quite tightly to keep it in place, then tuck in the sides to seal in the filling and continue to roll until you get to the other end of the pastry.
5 As you reach the end, load the tip of the brush with a little water and brush it over the end of the pastry – this will help seal the filo and prevent it unravelling during cooking.
6 Place the filled filo cigar, join-side down, on a plate and cover with another damp dish towel to keep it moist. Continue with the remaining sheets of filo and filling until all the filling has been used.
7 Heat enough oil for deep-frying in a wok or other deep-sided pan and deep-fry the filo cigars in batches for 5-6 minutes until crisp and golden brown. Lift out of the oil with a slotted spoon and drain on kitchen paper.
8 Serve immediately, garnished with dill fronds if you like.

From The Complete Book of Turkish Cooking by Ghillie Bașan

#25
♥JaNNaH♥

♥JaNNaH♥

    Honorary Algerian

  • Moderators
  • 5,092 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:London

Current mood:
Cheese Bourak, Bouraks au fromage, Bouraks Dj'ben

Ingredients:

1 dozen brik sheets (Filo pastry).
300g of minced meat.
1 piece of Swiss cheese (for instance Gruyere)
1 onion (Grated).
1 pinch of cinnamon.
1 pinch of black pepper.
2 tablespoons of butter.
1 bunch of parsley. (Chopped quite finely)
Salt.

Preparation:

Mix the minced meat with the onion, parsley, cinnamon, pepper
and salt.

Cook it with a spoonful of butter.

Cut the cheese slices into rectangles rather thin
of 2 cm by 5 cm.

Separate Brik sheets (filo pastry)Cover with a damp dishcloth to stop them drying out.

At the end of each sheet place a tablespoon of stuffing.

Cover with a slice of cheese.

Fold the edges.

Roll into a cigar shape, starting with

the side containing the stuffing.

Place them in a fairly hot frying pan, containing the butter, cook on medium heat.

Fry both sides.

Serve hot with lemon slices.

Comments: You can experiment with other types of cheese.

Recipe supplied by Amina, translated by her and I, slightly altered by me

#26
♥JaNNaH♥

♥JaNNaH♥

    Honorary Algerian

  • Moderators
  • 5,092 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:London

Current mood:
Meat Bourak, Bouraks à la viande, Bouraks bel h'm

Ingredients:

1 dozen Brik sheets (Filo pastry sheets).
300 g minced meat.
4 eggs.
Bunch of parsley (Chopped quite finely).
Bunch of spinach (Washed and cut into strips).
1 small onion (Grated).
1 tablespoon butter.
1 pinch of black pepper
1 pinch of cinnamon.
Salt.
Oil for frying.

Preparation:

Mix the butter, onion, minced beef and spices, and simmer on a low heat about 10 minutes.

Cook the spinach on a low heat.

Make an omelet of the eggs and parsley.

Mix the meat and spinach.

Separate Brik sheet (Filo pastry) Cover with a clean damp dish cloth to avoid them drying out.

At the end of each of them place a tablespoon of the meat mixture and cover with a little omelet.

Fold both edges of the sheet opposite to get a rectangle.

Roll into a cigar shape starting with the side containing the stuffing.

Serve hot on a tray, with lemon slices.

Recipe supplied by Amina, translated by her and I, slightly altered by me

#27
♥JaNNaH♥

♥JaNNaH♥

    Honorary Algerian

  • Moderators
  • 5,092 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:London

Current mood:
Brik à l’oeuf



Some years ago, one of my favorite restaurants, Road to Karakesh, closed down. Karakesh specialized in “cuisine from the spice road”, and among many other things, gave me my first taste of doro wat.

The one thing I missed terribly was brik à l’oeuf - thin pastry wrapped around tuna and an egg, fried and served with chili sauce. None of my cookbooks had a recipe, and I searched bookstores in vain for one that did.

Eventually, I searched online and found precisely one recipe, credited to Hayet Lehssairi. It now exists only in the Google cache, and I feel I must preserve it. So here it is, as originally written:

INGREDIENTS

For one brik per person
1 circle of filo pastry
1 egg
½ soup spoon of stuffing per person
Oil for frying

For the stuffing
150g lamb or veal (can also use tuna)
Salt and black pepper
2 soup spoons of finely chopped onion
1 glass water
4 soup spoons parsley, finely chopped
1 knob butter
Salt and black pepper

To make the stuffing, chop the meat, then season. Put into a pan with the onion and water and cook until the water has evaporated. Mince the meat, add the parsley and butter and warm together for two or three minutes.

To make the brik, take filo pastry circle and fold in the edges to form a square. Place half a soup spoon of stuffing into its centre, together with a raw egg. Fold one corner of the square to the opposite corner and seal edges. Slide into hot oil and spoon oil over the brik until it swells and turns golden. Serve hot with the egg still runny.

Hayet Lehssairi

This morning, I stared unhappily at my crepe recipe, not wanting crepes, but unsure what I did want. “Brik,” said my back brain. “You want brik.”

And so I did. Here is my version of Hayet Lehssairi’s brik recipe, adapted for what I had in my house, and for more standard measurements.

Makes 2 large briks.

For each brik:
1 spring roll wrapper
1 egg
½ stuffing
Safflower oil for frying
Chili garlic sauce (I keep the Huy Fong “rooster” chili garlic sauce around).

For the stuffing:
1 can chunk light tuna, preferably unsalted
Salt and black pepper
1/2 medium yellow onion, finely chopped
2 tbsp water
1 tsp dried parsley
1 tbsp unsalted butter

Melt the butter in a sautee pan. Add the drained can of tuna, the onion, and the water, and cook until the water has evaporated. Add black pepper, salt, and the parsley, and stir to combine. Turn off the heat.

Heat the safflower oil in a Dutch oven on the stovetop. You will want about 3/4 of an inch of oil in the bottom of the pan, maybe less.

Crack 1 egg over a bowl, and let the runny part of the white run out (you can crack it into your hand and let it run through your fingers, or crack it in half and let it drip out of the shell). The original recipe needs very fresh eggs, which have a solid white; the runny white of not-so-fresh eggs is No Good and will ruin your brik.

Lay your spring roll wrapper out on a flat surface, and brush the edges with water. Place half the stuffing in the center, and your de-runnified egg on top. Fold diagonally, then brush the tops of the fold and fold them over themselves to form a nice tight seal.

Slide into hot oil and spoon oil over the brik until it puffs up nicely and the edges are golden brown. Carefully turn it over (I used a spider) to brown the top. Drain on paper towels or brown paper bags for a few minutes, then serve with chili garlic sauce.

Unholy good, and a delicious breakfast, lunch, or make 2 per person for dinner.

Next time I make it, I’m going to add a teaspoon of capers to the filling; Karakesh’s version had them, and I think they’d play nicely in this one.

http://www.premodern...2/brik-a-loeuf/

#28
^_^Chaouia^_^

^_^Chaouia^_^
  • Girls
  • 3,647 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Tkout,Algeria - Edmonton, Alberta

Current mood: Woot!
Egg Briks

Ingredients

* 4 eggs
* 4 phyllo pastry sheets
* 1 (320 g) can tuna in vegetable oil, drained
* 3/4 cup parmesan cheese
* 3/4 cup mashed potatoes (optional)
* 4 teaspoons harissa
* 4 tablespoons flat leaf parsley
* 2 lemons
* 3 cups oil (for frying)

Directions


Directions are given per brik!!!

Place the phyllo sheet on a work surface. Phyllo is rectangular. Either cut it to make a square, or fold the phyllo so you work with a single layer sheet.

Using only the top half of the phyllo sheet, spoon 1 tablespoonful of tuna onto the phyllo. Sprinkle 1/4 the amount of parmesan onto the tuna. (If using mashed potato, put 1/4 of the mashed potato onto the tuna and parmesan.) Dot 1 teaspoon of harissa around the mixture. Sprinkle on 1 tablespoon or less of parsley. Make sort of an open circle with the mixture.

Now, crack open an egg, and drop it on this mixture in a way that the mixture won't let the egg white run out easily. The mixture should surround the egg.

Fold the bottom half of the phyllo sheet over the top half. This will cover the whole mixture. Seal the edges with egg white as you make the fold. If you have excess pastry per brik, just fold the excess in towards the center of the brik; it will resemble an envelope.

Slip this brik into hot oil. Fry 30 seconds on one side, or until the phyllo is a golden brown color. Turn it, and fry the other side, also 30 seconds, or until the color is golden brown.

Continue with the other briks.

Serve with lemon wedges to squeeze into every bite, salad and tomato.
TamattuT nnegh machi ghir i waghrom
Tattali zang u yis wa Traffed' agastur."
The shawi woman isn't just for house work
She rides the horse and carries a sword.

#29
^_^Chaouia^_^

^_^Chaouia^_^
  • Girls
  • 3,647 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Tkout,Algeria - Edmonton, Alberta

Current mood: Woot!
Algerien Potato Turnovers -Briks

Adapted from a recipe in Joyce Goldstein's cookbook, Saffron Shores.


Ingredients

* 1 lb russet potato, peeled and cut into 1 inch chunks
* 1 onion, peeled and chopped
* 2 cloves garlic, peeled and minced
* 1 tablespoon olive oil
* 3 tablespoons minced parsley
* 3 tablespoons minced fresh cilantro
* 1 tablespoon drained capers, rinsed and coarsely chopped
* 1 teaspoon salt
* 1/2 teaspoon fresh ground pepper
* 1 large egg, separated
* 12 egg roll wraps (6-inch squares)
* vegetable oil (for frying)

Directions


Boil potatoes in salted water until they mash easily, about 15 minutes.

Drain and mash with potato masher until smooth.

In small frying pan over medium heat, stir onion and garlic in oil until onion is very limp, about 10 minutes.

Cook slowly--reduce heat if it starts to brown.

When onions are soft, stir in potatoes, parsley, cilantro, capers, salt and pepper.

In a small bowl, beat egg yolk to blend; add to potato mixture and mix well.

In another small bowl, beat egg white to blend.


Cut egg roll wrapper into four squares (keep covered with plastic wrap until ready to use or it will dry out).

Place about 1 1/2 teaspoons potato mixture in the center of each square.

Brush edges lightly with egg white.

Fold each square diagionally over filling to form a triangle; pinch edges to seal.

Pour 2 inches of oil into a heavy 5-quart pan over medium heat.

When oil reaches 375 degrees F, using a slotted spoon or a mesh basket and working in batches of 6 to 12 (cook only what will fit easily in one layer) lower pastries into oil.

Fry until golden brown, turning once, 3 to 5 minutes total.

Transfer to paper towel-lined baking sheets to a 200 degree F oven and keep warm up to 30 minutes.

Allow oil to return to 375 degrees F before you put in next batch.

#30
Apocalypse

Apocalypse

    revolution

  • Darja Gurus
  • 1,698 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:homeland

Current mood: Procrastinating
Looks like there are many variations of bourek in here, anyway, i'll post mine, it is very simple

1- Minced Meat Bourek:

Ingredients:

1 dozen Brik sheets
400g minced meat. (according to the need)
2 eggs.
Bunch of parsley (Chopped quite finely).
4 Onions slightly chopped
Butter.
1 pinch of black pepper
1 pinch of cinnamon.
1 pinch of Ginger
Salt.
Cheese


In a casserole you put chopped onions with a tablespoon of oil on a low heat until it starts getting a golden colour, then close the casserole and leave it for about 15 mn.

Before the onions start turning to brown stir in the minced meat with salt and pepper then close the casserole again.

About five minutes later add gignger, cinnamon and leave it on the low heat until it is cooked then add the two eggs and the parsley at the end, mix them with the preparation and let it cook for about 2 minutes.

Once cooked and cooled down, take the brick sheets, cut each into two parts and put about a tablespoon of the previous preparation with some cheese (the quantity according to the type of cheese you're using and according to the person's taste)

Fold both edges of the sheet opposite to get a rectangle and roll into a cigar shape starting with the side containing the stuffing.

Put them in an oven plate and put small knobs of butter on each of the bricks and put it in the oven for about 30 minutes until they become golden brown.

Many people fry them but I thin it is healthier to cook them in the oven, especially as we eat them everyday in Ramadhan.


2- Chicken Bourek:

1 dozen Brik sheets
300g minced chicken. (according to the need)
2 Boiled eggs.
Bunch of parsley (Chopped quite finely).
2 Onions slightly chopped
Butter.
1 pinch of black pepper
1 pinch of cinnamon.
1 pinch of Ginger
Salt.
Cheese

In a casserole you put chopped onions with a tablespoon of oil on a low heat until it starts getting a golden colour, then close the casserole and leave it for about 15 mn.

Before the onions start turning to brown stir in the minced chiken with salt and pepper then close the casserole again.

About five minutes later add gignger, cinnamon and leave it on the low heat until it is cooked then add parsley at the end,

Grate the two boiled eggs and add them to the mixture once cooked and cooled down,

Take the brick sheets, cut each into two parts (I know our bourek is much smaller than the one in Algiers and the east :D ) and put about a tablespoon of the previous preparation with some cheese (the quantity according to the type of cheese you're using and according to the person's taste)

Fold both edges of the sheet opposite to get a rectangle and roll into a cigar shape starting with the side containing the stuffing.

Put them in an oven plate and put small knobs of butter on each of the bricks and put it in the oven for about 30 minutes until they become golden brown.
Ps: cinnamon and Ginger give a special flavour to the chicken in this bourek, trust me it is delicious


3- Tuna Bourek:

1 dozen Brik sheets
Two cans of Tuna
2 Boiled eggs.
Bunch of parsley (Chopped quite finely).
2 Onions slightly chopped
Butter.
1 pinch of black pepper
1 pinch of Ginger
Salt.
Cheese

well you do the same thing as the chicken bourek excepting for the cinnamon, never use cinnamon with any type of fish.

4- Bourek with minced meat and vegetables:


1 dozen Brik sheets
300g Minced meat
1 red pepper (cut into small slashes)
1 green pepper (cut into small slashes)
1 cougette (grated)
Bunch of parsley (Chopped quite finely).
4 Onions slightly chopped
Butter.
1 pinch of black pepper
1 pinch of Ginger
Salt.
Cheese

start by cooking the onions on a low heat, when it starts to get a golden colour close the casserole, about 8 minutes latter add the red pepper + green pepper + grated courgette+ the minced meat + salt and black pepper and close the casserole again.

about 10 minutes later add ginger and the pinch of cinnamon and let it cook slowly.

once cooked and cooled down put the mixture in the bricks the same way as mentioned before and of course don't forget the cheese because it makes the magic in this case.

cook it in the oven with small butter knobs on each bourek.

Now I have to go, I'll tell you about the fish bourek and Prawn bourek later.
  • Fatony and Saffron like this


#31
Apocalypse

Apocalypse

    revolution

  • Darja Gurus
  • 1,698 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:homeland

Current mood: Procrastinating
sorry, I forgot to mention a pinch of cumin in the Tuna Bourek

#32
Apocalypse

Apocalypse

    revolution

  • Darja Gurus
  • 1,698 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:homeland

Current mood: Procrastinating
Minced-meat Turnovers:

Posted ImageI made these myself :D

Made with Flaky Pastry,
you get:

400g Minced-meat
5 Onions
300g mushrooms
1 1/2 red sweet pepper
salt + black pepper
Parsley
spices: ginger, a pinch cinnamon
cheese
1 egg yolk

Cut the onions in small pieces and put in a casserole until it starts getting a golden colour then close the casserole and leave tan on a low heat.
about 5 minutes later add the red pepper and the muchrooms, and close it again
Again after five minutes add the minced meat (which is minced with garlic), salt and pepper and the spices and close the casserole until everyting has cooked, then you add parsley at the end.

open the flaky pastry in a rectagular shape, cut into squares then in each square you put about a tbsp of the preparation plus some cheese on one patch of the square then take the other part and put it above then using a fork close the triangle you just obtained.
Carve the upper parts of the triangle as in a moon shape, well! like the ones in the picture, then using a brush put some egg yolk on each turnover to get a golden brown colour on the above.


Posted Image
  • ♥JaNNaH♥ likes this

#33
♥JaNNaH♥

♥JaNNaH♥

    Honorary Algerian

  • Moderators
  • 5,092 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:London

Current mood:
I made a mistake to come here, you're making me soooooooooooooooooo hungry!!! :D