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#1
^_^Chaouia^_^

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1 kilo ground beef or lamb (2 pounds)
1/2 tablespoon bicarbonate of soda(baking soda)
1 tablespoon each salt and black pepper
beef or sheep intestines as required
1 tablespoon of olive oil
1 tsp. parsley, chopped finely
1/2 tablespoon hot paprika (or more or less to taste)
1/2 tablespoon dried oregano
1 tablespoon of harrisa

In a mixing bowl combine the ground meat with the bicarbonate of soda and 1/2 tsp. each of the salt and black pepper. Mix well. add the remaing spices and mix until all is mixed well.

Clean the intestines well cutting off any fat that may cling and washing thoroughly. Stuff the intestines with the ground meat mixture and by twisting the sausages every 2 inches until you get a sausage looking link, keep doing this till its all links

In a heavy skillet heat 3 Tbsp. of the oil and in this fry the sausages until dark brown on all sides, or you can grill them if desired
TamattuT nnegh machi ghir i waghrom
Tattali zang u yis wa Traffed' agastur."
The shawi woman isn't just for house work
She rides the horse and carries a sword.

#2
Fatony

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is there anything else we could use apart from intestines..?
There are people with experience and people with opinions. Listen to one, smile at the other.
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#3
Azie

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lool didnt u kno thats all they use? to hold it 2gether
eek once u thin kabout it its kinda like makes u skwirmy lol
I want to die with My forehead on the ground... The sunnah in my heart...Allah on my mind...Quran on my tongue...And tears in my eyes

#4
^_^Chaouia^_^

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thats all i know that u can use :(

#5
^_^Chaouia^_^

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INGREDIENTS:

3 lb. lean lamb trim
1 Tbsp. salt
1 1/2 Tbsp. cumin
2 tsp. coarse ground black pepper
4 Tbsp. paprika
1 1/2 tsp. cayenne
1 tsp. cinnamon
1/2 c. pomegranate juice
1 1/2 Tbsp. minced garlic
1 tsp. dry ginger
1 tsp. thyme leaves
lamb/or goat casings for stuffing

Grind lamb trimmings once through the medium (1/8-inch)
plate of a meat grinder. Mix together all remaining ingredi-
ents; pour over meat and mix well with your hands. Grind
through the 1/8-inch plate again with a stuffing horn attached
into lamb/or goat casings. Twist or tie into 5-inch lengths.

#6
^_^Chaouia^_^

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INGREDIENTS:


3 lb. lean lamb trim
1 Tbsp. salt
1 1/2 tsp. hot papkika powder
1 1/2 tsp. coarse ground black pepper
1/2 tsp. cinnamon
1/2 tsp. thyme
1/2 c. currants
1/2 c. pomegranate juice
1 Tbsp. minced garlic
lamb/or goat casings for stuffing

Grind lamb trimmings once through a meat grinder's
1/4-inch plate. Mix together salt, hot papkrika powder, black pepper,
cinnamon, thyme, currants, pomegranate juice and minced garlic.
Pour seasonings over meat and mix well with your hands.
Rinse the casings well in cold running water. Stuff
meat mixture into casing and twist or tie into 5-inch lengths.

#7
SAEEDA~ROUKAYA

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:D Actually.. I have a nice special secret name for mergaz...which I don't use often....mergz always remind *me of something subhanallah. :wub:

:I donít know the key to success, but the key to failure is trying to please everybody:

#8
♥JaNNaH♥

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eeek so many versions, which is from where?!
Truly, to Allaah we belong and truly, to Him we shall return

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#9
♥JaNNaH♥

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Algerian Lamb Sausage Merguez

35 min prep


Algerians like their sausage spicy and with an exceptional array of seasonings. The version that follows can be considered medium hot, with pepper and chili providing the heat, while the garlic adds the aromatic richness.

10 sausages (change servings and units)

Ingredients

* 2 lbs boneless lamb, cut into 2 inch pieces
* 4 ounces lamb, fat attached to the lamb kidney
* 2 heads garlic, about 12 cloves, peeled
* 1 teaspoon salt (to taste)
* 1 teaspoon black pepper
* 1 tablespoon ground cumin
* 1 tablespoon ground coriander
* 1 tablespoon sumac
* 1 tablespoon red hot chili powder
* 2 tablespoons sweet paprika
* 1 cup cold water
* 1 small lamb intestine casing

Directions



Grind the lamb, fat from the lamb kidney (do not add the kidney) and garlic with the medium size holes of the grinder, ľ inch in diameter. Add all the remaining ingredients, including the water, but not the casing. Test the mixture at this stage by preparing a miniature patty and frying it in a teaspoon of oil in a skillet. Should it need salt, it can be added at this time.


Tie one end of the casing tightly to hold the filling. Fill the casing with the lamb mixture, twisting it around every 4 inches to make individual sausages.


The merguez can be eaten in various ways the next day. The simple method of cooking is to fry them in hot vegetable oil until brown and crisp. Very little oil is needed since the sausage contains lamb fat. Serve warm. Makes about 10 to 12 sausages.


NOTE: Algerians often prepare merguez with the cheaper cuts of lamb, especially the scraps left over from trimming the more expensive parts. You donít have to do this since the meaty leg of the lamb is an ideal cut that can be used.


Sumac is that rare Mediterranean and Middle East seasoning that was used at one time as a salt substitute. The dried reddish crushed powder has a lemon/salt flavor and is used in meat and chicken dishes. It adds an important flavor to Algerian merguez.

From The Great Book Of Couscous.

http://www.recipezaa...-Merguez-305123

#10
SAEEDA~ROUKAYA

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Merguez,Merguez,Merguez. :sly:

#11
♥JaNNaH♥

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Thanks Rouky, you just made me notice, somehow I'd double posted!

#12
♥JaNNaH♥

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Merguez Sausage and Qadid, North African Preserved Meats


These two preserved meats from North Africa, or sausage in the case of merguez, were made by the Bedouin as well as the population at large. Merguez sausage, as it is now known, is a fresh or dried lamb sausage, also made with veal, usually formed in thin 4-inch links, highly spiced, and used in a variety of Tunisian preparations. Tunisians prefer the dried variety that is stored in olive oil-filled earthenware containers.

Merguez, for which there are several spellings even in Arabic (mirkas (ﻤﺮﻛﺲ), pl. marākis (ﻤﺮﺍﻛﺲ), mirkās (ﻤﺮﻛﺎﺱ), markas (ﻤﺭﻛﺲ) and mirqāz (ﻤﺮﻗﺲ) is famous in the Maghrib and perhaps is a derivation from the Greek mazes kreas (μάζης κρέας) which has the same sense.

The first written recipe for merguez (mirqāz) sausage is in an anonymous thirteenth-century Hispano-Muslim cookery book. Today there are several varieties, such as mirqaz kibda bi’l-liyya, made in the ratio of two thirds mutton liver to one third fat (liyya) and seasoned with harīsa, tābil, and salt. Mirqaz sayim is a sun-dried sausage preserved in olive oil after frying and is made with two parts lamb or mutton meat to one part fat and seasoned with harīsa, cinnamon, dried rose petals, salt, and black pepper. Mirqaz baqri is sun-dried veal sausage seasoned with preserved lemon, aniseed, harīsa, tābil, salt, and black pepper. Mirqaz dawwara is a sun-dried veal offal sausage preserved in olive oil after frying. It is made with coarsely chopped veal kidneys, tripe, heart, lung, and liver and seasoned with preserved lemon, harīsa, tābil, aniseed, salt, and black pepper.

In place of making your own merguez, the D’Artagnan company makes an excellent fresh merguez.

Qadīd (also transliterated kedide) is lamb jerky, a cured lamb meat prepared for the ‘Id al-adha festival (also called the ‘Id al-kabīr), the holiday feast celebrating the sacrifice of Abraham in Algeria and Tunisia. Qadīd is said to have been introduced to North Africa by the Arabs. Lamb meat is rubbed with garlic and lots of salt and left to dry for a day. Then the meat is rubbed with a spice mix of ground red chile, ground caraway and coriander seeds, and dried mint and sun-dried for some time. The qadīd is submerged in hot olive oil, as the merguez is, and then stored in glass or earthenware jars with the oil.

Merguez Sausage
Mirqaz or mirkas

Region: Tunisia
Category: Sausage, Grilled Sausage, Mixed
Season: Any
Difficulty: Labor Intensive

Merguez, the French transliteration of the Arabic word mirqāz or mirkās, is a spicy small sausage used in Tunisia and Algeria. It is served alone as a meze or sometimes with couscous or other foods such as the braised dishes known as tagines. They can be sun-dried too by leaving them in hot, dry, direct sunlight for 48 hours, protected against insects and animals, puncturing the sausage with a skewer so they dry better. Once they are dried, heat some olive oil, turn the heat off, and submerge the dried merguez in the oil for 20 minutes. Store them in glass or earthenware jars filled with the same olive oil.

Yield: Makes 3 pounds sausage
Preparation Time: 1 1/2 days

2 pounds diced boneless lamb shoulder with its attached fat

3/4 pound diced lamb fat

4 large garlic cloves, pounded in a mortar with 1 tablespoon salt

1 teaspoon freshly ground fennel seeds

1 teaspoon harīsa

1/2 teaspoon ground cayenne pepper

1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

About 10 feet of lamb intestine casing (preferably) or hog casing

1. In a large bowl, toss together thoroughly the lamb shoulder, lamb fat, garlic, fennel seeds, harīsa, cayenne pepper, and black pepper. Cover with plastic wrap and leave overnight to allow the flavors to blend.

2. Open one end of the casing, fit it over the faucet in your kitchen sink, and place the remainder of the casing in a medium-size bowl in the sink. Turn the water on gently to wash out the casings. The casings are sold cleaned; you are merely washing away preserving salts and residue. Now you are ready to start stuffing.

3. Affix one end of the casing over the funnel attached to the sausage stuffing attachment of a stand mixer or meat grinder. Push the entirety of the casing onto the length of the funnel (it will contract and fit fine), leaving about 2 inches dangling from the end. Tie this end in a double knot.

4. Turn the grinder or mixer on and as the sausage stuffing begins to flow into the casing, it will push the casing off the funnel. Have a large bowl or platter ready to catch the sausages. Twist or tie off the sausage with kitchen twine to make links at 4-inch intervals, or leave to make several very long sausages. Do not overstuff the sausage otherwise it will burst, either then and there, or during cooking. Also be careful that the sausage stuffing enters the casing continuously and evenly and that no air bubbles develop. If air bubbles do occur, it is better either to cut the sausage at that point and start a new one, by tying the end off, or to prick the air bubbles with a toothpick.

5. The sausages can be divided into portions of different or the same weights and frozen for later use in freezer bags for 2 to 4 months or you can cook them immediately. Refrigerate for not more than 2 days. If cooking them, place the sausages in a large pot and cover with water. Bring to a boil and, just as the water begins to bubble, reduce the heat to below a boil and poach the sausages for 10 minutes, if grilling or frying, or 40 minutes if serving them boiled.

http://www.clifforda...pe_id/826/id/8/