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Election boycott, the right solution?

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#1
Wahrania

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I was watching Question d'actu on Canal Algerie yesterday, a discussion was held amongst many young Algerians from various wilayas about the upcoming legislative elections as well as the Algerian political system in general.
The majority agreed that they refused to vote because they had lost total faith in the system and they knew for a fact that voting would not change anything.
Is boycotting the election the right solution? What are your thoughts?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QBNhEmHJLvU
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#2
Beebo

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There are only 2 options.. To vote or not to vote. What's the point of voting for anyone if they're nothing but liars and if there is no better alternative, the only way is to boycott the vote altogether.

Boycotting is a great way to display dismay and distrust in the system (not that they give a oops about what the public thinks or feels). You have to understand that people are sick of the same thing over and over again, like one of the participants said "there are party representatives who say that they speak on behalf of the young generation yet they're over 50 years old." How is that a representation of the younger generation?

The whole political scene needs to be changed and new young blood needs to be injected into it, otherwise Algerians will never have faith in a system that's infested with old, ignorant, dishonest, power-thirsty wolves

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#3
Apocalypse

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The fact that Algerian votes have never been counted is not a novelty in Algeria. It's a very normal and common thing. The uncommon thing is to hear that some votes have really been counted somewhere and the real result was given. Anyhow, that's just how I feel. As for this years vote my question is what makes government so thoughtful and so concerned about the importance of voting this year that they're not so much focusing on who should the people vote on as much as they do about the necessity of having the people to vote. I don't think that sentence is correct, I'd re-read it later, my point is, I saw someone from the government on a video lately on facebook from an ENTV program who said that people MUST vote even of they want to leave the envelope empty!!! Now that comes from a government representative! what a shame! The second thing he said was a direct threatning to the people who chose not to vote, he said there will be ink on the fingers of the voters and of course we can recognize those who didn't vote by their fingers! So now what? those hwo don't have ink will go to jail? what if they washed their hands after voting? they're still going to jail cuz there's no more ink in their fingers? seriously this is a joke!


#4
Wahrania

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Beebo, I hear you.
But I'll play the devil's advocate here - it's obvious that not voting hasn't changed anything either.
Now if voting or not doesn't make a difference, shouldn't we be looking at alternate solutions ?
Also, if we do not fulfill our civic duties as Algerian citizens can we really claim our rights?

Apoca, I'm actually speechless. If someone from our government would actually dare threaten the people to vote and on national TV for that matter - we have quite a problem. Goes to show how ignorant some people can be. During the show Question d'actu I was actually shocked at how difficult it was for a lot of the university students and graduates to formulate structured and pertinent sentences. Very few of them demonstrated the ability to think critically. I honestly think our curriculum should be re-evaluated as well as our education system as a whole - but that's another issue for another day.

#5
Beebo

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Now if voting or not doesn't make a difference, shouldn't we be looking at alternate solutions ?


Well like I said above, in this situation there are 2 options Vote or not Vote and the solution is to obviously get new blood into the scene which would be the only way (in my opinion) Algerians would flood the voting booths.

#6
•eve•

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salam

I definitely think boycotting is not the way to go.
As a citizen it is your duty to vote, by boycotting you are not doing your part of the deal so you don't get to have the right to ask for new parties or better gov. or whatever..
It is best if you go vote n leave the envelop empty as the gov. guy Apocalypse mentioned said.
Because when people do that it will leave a bigger impact, when getting empty envelopes, but by boycotting it's not the same..
You know how corrupted the current parties are, there won't be like an empty place where your vote was supposed to be, no.
Some parties will use your vote to their advantage n add it to their votes.
So basically, by doing your duty, you will actually help stop corruption.

So go vote E-DZers :D be good citizens!

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#7
Apocalypse

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Sorry Eve, I totally disagree, we're no sheep smile.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':)' />

Wahrania the fact htat Algerian students can't talk on television is that the language we use in our daily life is not used on television, not even in movies, so it's kinda wierd to use it, the language spoken on televison is not used in daily life and its kinda wierd to use it, I had the chance to speak once on the radio and I was liek them, I couldn't make a sentence, my sentences were all English!