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Algeria's Hostage Situation

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#1
Beebo

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The militants, via a Mauritanian news website, claimed that 35 hostages and 15 militants died in the helicopter strafing. A spokesman for the Masked Brigade told the Nouakchott Information Agency in Mauritania that only seven hostages survived.

By nightfall, Algeria's government said the raid was over. But the whereabouts of the rest of the plant workers was unclear.

U.S. President Barack Obama and British Prime Minister David Cameron spoke on the phone to share their confusion. White House Press Secretary Jay Carney said the Obama administration was "seeking clarity from the government of Algeria."

 

Source: http://www.cbc.ca/ne...atural-gas.html

 

 

In the last couple of days, Algeria has been a very hot topic in the news worldwide. Unfortunately as always, it wasn't something positive by any stretch of the imagination, not that i'm surprised.

 

So, what do you guys think? Is this part of France's plot to get back into Algeria?


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#2
γΝγΟ - Mohammed

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You mean a flase flag operation? I doubt it, if the french want anything i would imagine they have the influence behind the scenes to simply ask for it.

 

But at the end of the day who knows. I just don't understand. Why have they decided to become good samaritans all of a sudden and rid Mali of terrorrists? Besides holding a french agent was france or its interests being attacked by these so called islamists? Is france being used simply because the usual suspects (america, uk) already have too much blood on their hands and would raise far too much suspicion if they were to get involved in yet another country? الله اعلم

 

It seems the whole arab/muslim world is in total turmoil. There is upheavel and western intervention eveywhere. Afghanistan, Iraq, Somalia, Libya, Egypt, Sudan, Yemen, Syria, Burma and now Mali.


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#3
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http://www.theglobea...article7534326/

 

I was reading the article above today and it talks about why Canada is helping out France in their military invasion of Mali. It's unbelievable how much "aid" Canada has sent to Mali in the last 5 years and of course it's not out of the goodness of their heart, but because of the rich Gold mines in the south of Mali and are mostly contracted to Canadian companies.

 

Also, there is great potential for oil reserves in the northern part of the country which has yet to be contracted out. This probably is what France and Canada are trying to secure through their "honest" and "honorable" "concerns" which they showed towards Malian democracy and the protection of its citizens from "Islamic Terrorists"

 

Since the Algerian government allowed for the French to use their airspace, so because of that, the terrorist group took action against Algeria with this hostage situation.

 

What's funny is that the Algerian government has released a statement saying that these terrorists entered Algeria through the Libyan borders and that Libya is the one to blame for this. I just hope things don't escalate any further than this.



#4
γΝγΟ - Mohammed

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Below is an extract from an interview on russia today with william engdahl, who believes the arab spring was engineered, talking about what he thinks are the reasons for french intervention.

 

RT: At a time when France and the rest of the Eurozone are trying to weather the economic crisis, what's Paris seeking to gain by getting involved in another conflict overseas?

 

William Engdahl: Well, I think the intervention in Mali is another follow-up to the French role in other destabilizations that we’ve seen, especially in Libya last year with the toppling of the Gadhafi regime. In a sense this is French neocolonialism in action.

 

But, interestingly enough, I think behind the French intervention is the very strong hand of the US Pentagon which has been preparing this partitioning of Mali, which it is now looming to be, between northern Mali, where al-Qaeda and other terrorists are supposedly the cause for French military intervention, andsouthern Mali, which is a more agricultural region. Because in northern Mali recently there have been huge finds of oil discovered, so that leads one to think that it’s very convenient that these armed rebels spill over the border from Libya last year and just at the same time a US-trained military captain creates a coup d’état in the Southern capital of Mali and installs a dictatorial regime against one of Africa’s few democratically elected presidents.

 

So this whole thing bears the imprint of US Africom [US Africa Command] and an attempt to militarize the whole region and its resources. Mali is a strategic lynchpin in that. It borders Algeria which is one of the top goals of these various NATO interventions from France, the US and other sides. Mauritania, the Ivory Coast, Guinea, Burkina Faso. All of this area is just swimming in untapped resources, whether it be gold, manganese, copper.

 

RT: Why was France the first Western country to get involved to such an extent? And what sort of message is this military initiative sending to its allies?

 

WE: Well I think that’s the Obama Administration’s strategy – let France take the hit on this as they did in Libya and other places in the past year and-a-half and the US will try and play a more discrete role in the background rather than being upfront as they were in Iraq and Afghanistan which cost the US huge amounts of credibility around the world. They’re playing a little bit more of a sly game here, but the rush for the US to announce its support the French military intervention and the actions of Africom over the past year and-a-half, two years ,in Mali make clear that this is a US operation with the French as a junior partner.


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#5
γΝγΟ - Mohammed

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Im starting to dislike the kinds of statements that are being made. Ive noticed a subtle shift in the things being said. 

 

We now have cameron comparing the situation in N. Africa to that of Afghanistan and Pakistan but on a different scale. "It is linked to al-Qaeda, it wants to destroy our way of life, it believes in killing as many people as it can". The french defence minister has described it as "an act of war". The pre-justifications have started folks.



#6
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I totally agree, I've been reading a lot of reports on this lately and each one is worse than the next. The western governments are trying to use Al-Qaeda again to alter the public's opinion and force the international community into accepting and allowing them to go into Mali.

 

I just hope that Algeria will not be dragged further into this 


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#7
Lilia

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salam

I've been reading a lot of reports on this lately

Considering the time allotted to this 'incident' by the national TV, you'd think this happens all the time, no biggie  :huh: 

And it was rapped up so fast! I'm glad it's over and all, the army did it's job, and even though there were casualties they did a great rescue. However, it makes one wonder: What's the real story?


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#8
Abu Daoud

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I'm glad the National TV had coverage. Algeria had such a vast news "blackout" for so long it's refreshing to see that journalists are out and covering the issues again. Yes, this may not be the best thing to be in the news for, but it happened, Algeria didn't ask for it like some countries in the west and Algeria dealt with it the best they could. Alhamdullilah.


Whoever recommends and helps a good cause becomes a partner therein, and whoever recommends and helps an evil cause shares in its burdens” Qur’an:4:85





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